coding, graphics, mobile, ui, Uncategorized, web design, web development

Winning Hackcess to Justice (NC)

It was a pleasure to meet Raleigh attorney Caroline DiMaio this weekend and to advance her vision of an app to help inform migrant workers of their legal rights.

Our creation placed first out of five entries at the Raleigh edition of Hackcess to Justice, a hackathon presented by the ABA Journal and the N.C. Bar Association.  The competition was held at Campbell Law School and sponsored by Citrix ShareFile, Lawyers Mutual, and Poyner Spruill, LLP.

(It’s kind of a small world: I learned of this hackathon from Matthew Wilcut, a legal-aid attorney (and developer!) I met at a Startup Weekend competition in Greensboro a few years ago.)

Press Coverage

“App to aid migrant workers wins 3rd Hackcess to Justice hackathon” (ABA Journal)

“Code of law: ‘Hackathon’ gives birth to ideas for bridging the justice gap” (N.C. Lawyers’ Weekly) (Subscription Required)

Official Contest Site

Learn more about the competition, including the esteemed panel of judges, the judging criteria, and other entries at the official site:

Hackess to Justice (NC) on Devpost

(As a developer with a long history in and around the legal profession, I was impressed by each of the other entries – I could see any of them in production!)

Interactive Prototype

This was developed using rapid prototyping techniques and the Bootstrap JavaScript/CSS framework.  It will take you through one “happy path” of a user learning about workplace-safety rights and engaging contact with legal aid:

mobile, Uncategorized, web development

All I Got Was This Lousy T-Shirt!

This weekend I participated in the official salesforce.com Mobile Developer Week.

All I got was this lousy T-shirt:

Official Salesforce Mobile Developer Week T-shirt Official Salesforce Mobile Developer Week T-shirt

OK I did get some good learning as Salesforce developers from Raleigh to Charlotte were introduced to Salesforce’s new mobile tools. We also hacked out a simple mobile-cloud app.

OK, so the shirt’s not that lousy — the shirt is American Apparel 100% cotton, with some spiffy multi-color screen-printed graphics — And I didn’t find a single louse on it. Plus, they gave us some pretty good chow from O. Henry Hotel‘s catering department.

But the key take-aways for me were meeting some very talented developers and learning more useful stuff about cloud & mobile… I’m grateful to SFDC and the organizers for putting on a very useful workshop.

coding, mobile, process, ui

RGreenway: Raleigh’s Greenway App

Picture this – you’ve wasted spent another weekend coding with precious few hours of daylight left to claim any outdoor recreation before the weekly grind. You’ve got cabin fever & need to get out for a nice walk/hike in the Great Outdoors. You need to find a public park, locate a parking spot, get a trail map, and check the weather forecast.

If you’re in Raleigh, there is indeed an app for that.

It’s called RGreenway, and its developer, Eric Majewicz, was kind enough to demo it for TriDroid last week.

Eric Majewicz demos the RGreenway app.
Eric Majewicz demos the RGreenway app (for Android).

Eric went over a lot of the challenges in building this app, from working with various APIs (e.g., MapQuest and iSpeech) to wrangling the geographic data for the trail maps (provided by the City of Raleigh, North Carolina, as part of an open data initiative).

RGreenway Screen Cap (Android)
RGreenway Screen Cap (Android)

His presentation was especially interesting, though, for its description of “soft” considerations beyond heads-down coding, such as building a team with a diverse skill set and gathering requirements from key stakeholders (a/k/a “users”). Taking this kind of care produced high-quality UI and UX — the ultimate measure of an app people will actually use and enjoy.